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About Film & Animation / Student Member Timothy Robert McKenzieMale/United States Group :icondexterslabseason5: DextersLabSeason5
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Yesterday, November 13th, was the 74th anniversary of the first release of Disney’s Fantasia (1940).

Anyway, like I said before, my three picks to represent pure and simple cinematic storytelling told with simplicity, with mostly visuals, and with little to no dialogue, are as follows in chronological order:

1. Fantasia | 1940 | dir. Ben Sharpsteen (supervisor)





2. 2001: A Space Odyssey | 1968 | dir. Stanley Kubrick





And last but not least:

3. Samurai Jack: The Birth of Evil: Part I/Part II (TV) | 2003 | dir. Genndy Tartakovsky and Robert Alvarez






Given that my three picks/choices represents pure and simple cinematic storytelling that is told with simplicity (i.e. mostly visuals and/or music as well as little to no dialogue)…

What do you think of Disney’s Fantasia, Stanley Kubrick’s 2001 A Space Odyssey and Genndy Tartakovsky’s 2003 Birth of Evil episodes of his Samurai Jack cartoon show, respectively?

Enter the Brave Toon World by timbox129
Enter the Brave Toon World

An Unlikely Heroine. An Epic Journey. A Fight to save Two Worlds. Enter the Brave Toon World.

This will be my so-called “Genndy Tartakovsky homage/tribute project”: ToonTalker.

And it is still in the planning or dreaming phases.

One approach I may explore for The Genndy Tartakovsky Project, aka ToonTalker, is to bookend the animation (which may comprise a full two hours or so) itself with live action sequences (which may comprise a full half hour or so including the first 25 or so minutes of it) in the same way The Wizard of Oz used a black-and-white real world to bookend the colorful land of Oz.

But The Genndy Tartakovsky Project/ToonTalker would also be a theatrical big screen feature film homage to the kind of animation that Genndy used to create between 1994 and 2010 at Hanna Barbara and Cartoon Network such as Samurai Jack, Dexter’s Laboratory and Sym-Bionic Titan, of all things.

ToonTalker/The Genndy Tartakovsky Project will not only take incidental inspiration from Genndy Tartakovsky’s Cartoon Network creations (most precisely Samurai Jack, especially in terms of design and animation style), but for the most part, The Genndy Tartakovsky Project, or ToonTalker, might also be a theatrical big screen feature film medley of tropes from (and references and salutes to) Genndy Tartakovsky’s Samurai Jack, Dexter’s Laboratory or even Sym Bionic Titan.

I will also use color to accentuate an idea that I may come up with right from the get-go of this project, which is to change aspect ratios at the point my main character (who may be a high school-age Asian girl) is magically transported to another dimension—the one inhabited by highly stylized Genndy Tartakovsky-type animated cartoon figures—and becomes a Genndy Tartakovsky-type cartoon. Up until that scene, the first twenty-five or so minutes of ToonTalker/The Genndy Tartakovsky Project might be set in a 1.85:1 ratio, but when the Asian girl (my main character) wakes up in her new physical state and in her new world, the ratio will widen to Cinemascope/Panavision’s 2.39:1, my intention being to give visual expression to the Asian teen girl’s altered view of another world as a cartoon. But before the change, I should keep the color palette toned down for the opening 25-minute live action wraparound, but it wouldn’t be devoid of color; I would just use muted or earthen versions of those selected for the cartoon world and for the rest of the movie. Once the aspect ratio change occurs, I will completely open up the color palette and brighten it to emphasize the feeling that, in her new Genndy Tartakovsky-type cartoon form, the Asian girl is seeing another world in a whole new way.

As for the high-school-age Asian heroine of ToonTalker/The Genndy Tartakovsky Project, given that Genndy Tartakovsky himself really didn’t have an Asian female as his most prominent protagonist in any of his works, I wanted the Asian teen girl in ToonTalker to be a far more complex character than your typical Asian girl or your typical teenage girl or perhaps your typical cartoon princess.

ToonTalker/The Genndy Tartakovsky Project will also be very much designed as a journey of some important value such as perception or things like that as much as it is a physical journey in a highly stylized Genndy Tartakovsky-inspired/influenced cartoon parallel world inspired by his highly stylized design and animation work on Samurai Jack.

Anyway, sorry that the description is long, and sure, you don't have to read all of it if you want, but what do you think?

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Have You Seen These Two Girls? by timbox129
Have You Seen These Two Girls?

This wanted-style poster is done for my proposed big screen Dexter’s Laboratory feature film idea (and epic quest tale) The Search for Mee Mee and Lee Lee.

Which will take Dexter and his sister Dee Dee (and five other persons that join Dexter and Dee Dee in a fellowship of seven) on an epic search across the boundaries of time, space, and beyond the infinite for the scattered remains of the living essence of Dee Dee’s best friends Mee Mee and Lee Lee—who never made it back to the real world when Dexter retrieves Dee Dee from the land of her imagination and were presumed dead—in order to resurrect Dee Dee’s presumably deceased pals Mee Mee and Lee Lee in Dexter’s Laboratory.

Not only would The Search for Mee Mee and Lee Lee address things like arrogance, racism, and sexism (and not to mention, counteract the racial and gender stereotypes inherent in Dexter’s Laboratory) as well as loyalty, courage, responsibility and good vs evil, but it would also deal with the three great mysteries of creation: life, death, and rebirth.

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The Ride of the Samurai by timbox129
The Ride of the Samurai

The Ride of the Samurai against They Who Must Not Be Named (aka ISIS).

Indeed, it is out from a time-warp that an ancient Japanese people—a Feudal Japanese Samurai Warlord and his vast army of Japanese samurai on horseback whose numbers may be beyond reckoning, no less—came to the aid and rescue of a modern American metropolis in the present day under siege from hordes of more modern ISIS-like terrorist forces whose name is so unspeakable that the terrorist legions are referred to only as “They Who Must Not Be Named”.

Done for my new proposed big screen Dexter’s Laboratory feature film idea,The Search for Mee Mee and Lee Lee.

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Three Examples of Pure Cinematic Storytelling by timbox129
Three Examples of Pure Cinematic Storytelling
Here are no less than three awesome (or totally epic) examples of pure cinematic storytelling with little to no dialogue and mostly visuals and/or music (in my opinion):

1. 2001: A Space Odyssey | 1968 | dir. Stanley Kubrick

2. Samurai Jack: The Birth of Evil (TV) | 2003 | dir. Genndy Tartakovsky and Robert Alvarez

3. Fantasia | 1940 | dir. Ben Sharpsteen (supervisor)

What would you think if one of my own project ideas—movie or otherwise—might be, in fact, greatly influenced and greatly inspired by as well as having very much a whole lot in common with Genndy Tartakovsky’s Birth of Evil episodes of Samurai Jack, Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, and Walt Disney’s Fantasia—as far as pure cinematic storytelling that has little to no dialogue as well as mostly visuals or music?

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Timothy Robert McKenzie
Artist | Student | Film & Animation
United States
Hello. My name is Tim. My favorite cartoons are Dexter's Laboratory and Samurai Jack, while one of my favorite movies is James Cameron's AVATAR. I always wanted to become a filmmaker and animation artist.
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Yesterday, November 13th, was the 74th anniversary of the first release of Disney’s Fantasia (1940).

Anyway, like I said before, my three picks to represent pure and simple cinematic storytelling told with simplicity, with mostly visuals, and with little to no dialogue, are as follows in chronological order:

1. Fantasia | 1940 | dir. Ben Sharpsteen (supervisor)





2. 2001: A Space Odyssey | 1968 | dir. Stanley Kubrick





And last but not least:

3. Samurai Jack: The Birth of Evil: Part I/Part II (TV) | 2003 | dir. Genndy Tartakovsky and Robert Alvarez






Given that my three picks/choices represents pure and simple cinematic storytelling that is told with simplicity (i.e. mostly visuals and/or music as well as little to no dialogue)…

What do you think of Disney’s Fantasia, Stanley Kubrick’s 2001 A Space Odyssey and Genndy Tartakovsky’s 2003 Birth of Evil episodes of his Samurai Jack cartoon show, respectively?

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:iconone-concerned:
One-Concerned Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2014
If I remade Dexter's Lab, how would you respond if I announced that Dee Dee wasn't allowed to dance?
Reply
:icontimbox129:
timbox129 Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2014  Student Filmographer
I know I am autistic, but would my quest to fulfill my dreams be built on as well end in controversy or not?

If so, would my actual life (especially on the internet and especially during the making of Dexter's Odyssey) might forever remain the subject of controversy?
Reply
:iconkittyacademy:
KittyAcademy Featured By Owner Jun 14, 2014   Digital Artist
I thought Japanese/Chinese Boys don't wear Komonos however you spell it.
Reply
:icontimbox129:
timbox129 Featured By Owner Jun 14, 2014  Student Filmographer
Well, Japanese and Chinese boys do wear their traditional clothes (kimonos for boys of the Japanese kind) in ancient days, and some modern Japanese boys (or sometimes girls) still wore traditional kimonos, though some wore more modern clothes. 

After all, Samurai Jack is a cartoon to you and I, so Jack still wears a kimono even as a child, given the fact that he is a time-displaced warrior prince.
Reply
:icontimbox129:
timbox129 Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2013  Student Filmographer
Hey guys, if you want to see Dexter's Lab and Samurai Jack screenshots and fan musings...

Then....

Check...

This...

Out!

[link]

Remember, here there be stills or screenshots from Samurai Jack as well as those from Dexter's Laboratory.

Not to mention my fan musings.

And BTW, while you're at it, what do you see on my Tumblr blog, "Timboxreloaded"?
Reply
:iconlipanel:
Lipanel Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2012
Hello?
Reply
:iconsumikuro:
Sumikuro Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2012
Dexter Odyssey sounds amazing, are you going to Calarts to learn animation?
Reply
:iconsoundofspheres:
soundofspheres Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012
Hello, if you're interested in making an epic film, I'd recommend reading "The Hero with a Thousand Faces" by Joseph Campbell. Some of the best directors have used it as a guide.
Reply
:icontimbox129:
timbox129 Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012  Student Filmographer
Here's an update for you, soundofspheres. It's official that I finally got the book "The Hero with a Thousand Faces" by Joseph Campbell yesterday on Christmas Morning 2012. Thank you, soundofsphere, for recommending me to read Joseph Campbell's classic 1949 book The Hero with a Thousand Faces, and I'll make sure to use that book as a guide if I am interested in making an epic film like my intended masterpiece (and proposed Dexter's Laboratory reboot) the monumental and colossal 12-part live action/animated epic that is Dexter's Odyssey.

Again, thanks a lot for recommending that influential book by Joseph Campbell to me.

Once again, Thank You!
Reply
:icontimbox129:
timbox129 Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Student Filmographer
Good recommendation, soundofspheres! I'll have that for Christmas!
Reply
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