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About Film & Animation / Student Member Timothy Robert McKenzieMale/United States Group :icondexterslabseason5: DextersLabSeason5
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People who really know animation might know not only the sad story of Richard Williams’ failed magnum opus The Thief and the Cobbler (1964-1992; released 1993 and 1995) but also the story of my dream passion project, Dexter’s Odyssey, which is Dexter’s Laboratory meets The Lord of the Rings with dinosaurs and shades of Samurai Jack.

This writer might spend years, or even decades, on this one film project, a multi-part and visually lush, dinosaur-infused epic fantasy tracing the epic Lord of the Rings-like journey of Dexter, Dee Dee (his sister) and Mee Mee and Lee Lee (Dee Dee’s black and Asian friends) on a quest across vast patches of dinosaur-inhabited wilderness and far off exotic distant lands in order to stop the evil Mandark (Dexter’s rival) from conquering and enslaving the world’s free peoples with a mighty war machine that he is secretly building after Mandark—furious that Dee Dee didn’t invited him to her birthday party—declares war on the free world.

This project will be intended by yours truly to be my masterpiece, but also one with a more realistic interaction between humans and dinosaurs than even that for The Flintstones (1960-66), as well as containing some of the most complex animations ever attempted onscreen whether it’s hand drawn or computer generated.

I may or I may not get full funding for the Dexter’s Odyssey project until I achieve success or even win an award or something, so for years or decades yet to come, I’d just pick at it, in-between working on other things, for Dexter’s Odyssey can be the whetstone with which I could hone my talent, craft, skills, and ideas.

And my art style might keep improving and changing, becoming more and more complex. Sure, 2D hand drawn traditional animation is largely out of style these days, replaced by digital 3D CGI animations such as TangledWreck-it RalphFrozen and most recently, Big Hero 6.

And you know, if I were to become a great animator, and if I were to hire many other animation hands—including the great animators of the 1980s and 1990s Disney Renaissance—to pass on their knowledge to a whole new generation of young animators before all that knowledge and especially the 2d hand drawn traditional animation techniques will be lost forever, then Dexter’s Odyssey will be one of my ways to learn. 

And if I do, I’ll set up my own studio to help train an entire new generation of young soon-to-be great animators and help make another revival in animation, one that will be very diverse especially in technique.

And sure, even more than just a footnote in animation history, Dexter’s Odyssey is gonna be a hugely influential animated movie project. And not to mention, a work of genius, pure and simple. I may be a genius who may be difficult to work with or demand perfection from my crew, but I may become an inspiration as well as a great teacher.

And sure, given my obsession over making Dexter’s Odyssey, I would also create some of the most spectacular, beautifully lush, and intricately complex animations of all time, hand drawn or CGI—for example, Mandark’s machine of war, which is filled with every piece of weaponry and machinery imaginable—and some of the most delightfully subtle. Plus beautiful cinematography and lighting effects; every in-camera and/or digital trick in the book, and a hundred which aren't.

Dexter’s Odyssey will not technically be a Disney movie for it is something absolutely unique: a giant epic animated film project that may be as though it is designed somewhere in the 20th century more than the 21st, using design trends from anywhere and from the 20th and 21st centuries, and all sorts of ideas, including a weird mash-up of different things that may seem unrelated to each other—from Dexter’s Laboratory cartoon characters to Samurai Jack cartoon characters to dinosaurs to Japanese samurai to even the Do Do Bird from the 1930s Warner Bros. Cartoon Short, Porky in Wackyland:

Sure, apart from the Do Do Bird from Porky in Wackyland, some or almost many of the characters (including Dexter, Dee Dee, Mee Mee and Lee Lee and Mandark) may look like they came out of Genndy Tartakovsky’s 1990s work on Dexter’s Laboratory or his work on Samurai Jack, but they could still move with perfect fluidity whether it’s realistic or stylized. It will be a dream on an epic scale and scope and with epic grandeur. And seriously, guys, the whole entire thing will be in the language of a great dream.

And seriously, guys, anything is possible in the world of the animation art-form.

Or as this sign above from the 1938 Warner Bros. Cartoon Porky in Wackyland says:

"IT CAN HAPPEN HERE

And only through animation can anything really possibly happen.

((And animation is not a genre. It is a technique.))

You understand, Your Majesty, Father of Samurai Jack?

Well, given my intention for Dexter’s Odyssey to be a really great epic masterpiece of animation art, of film or cinematic art, and of human art, it will be unsurprising that Dexter’s Odyssey will also not just be an animated cartoon movie or a Disney movie but a really epic event and epic experience.

I just wanted just about everything about Dexter’s Odyssey to really blow away just about everyone (especially those who will get to see it)—and it’ll be like realizing there’s a whole other half of David Lean’s Lawrence of Arabia right after that movie’s intermission, or that Michelangelo’s Adam isn't just sicking his pointy finger at the sky on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel (And you know, Adam is just sticking his pointy finger directly at the finger of Almighty God).

Do you understand, Go Go Tomago?

Yes, this may be as far removed from the tone and scope of one of its source materials (Dexter’s Laboratory, a kids cartoon show from the mid to late 1990s that is pretty standard as far as storytelling) as can be imagined…

Yes, it will be a weird mash up of different things that may be seemingly unrelated to each other from Dexter’s Lab cartoon characters and/or Samurai Jack cartoon characters to dinosaurs to Japanese samurai to elements of the quest plot of J.R.R. Tolkien’s three-volume fantasy epic The Lord of the Rings (battles and all) to even the Do Do Bird from the obscure 1938 Warner Bros. cartoon short, Porky in Wackyland

Yes, to use said different things seemingly unrelated to each other, from Dexter’s Laboratory cartoon characters and/or Samurai Jack cartoon characters to dinosaurs to Japanese samurai to even said Do Do bird from Porky in Wackyland, not just like characters but also like toys on a child’s play-set will be a daring, challenging, and bold move, and to try and accurately animate dinosaurs based on today’s scientific research will be a challenge as daunting as mounting an epic Lord of the Rings-style battle, especially if they involve Japanese samurai…

And yes, instead of the usual comedic misadventures of Dexter and his sister Dee Dee, it will trace the epic Lord of the Rings-like journey of Dexter, his sister Dee Dee, and Dee Dee’s two friends Mee Mee and Lee Lee, on an epic Lord of the Rings-like quest to stop Dexter’s rival Mandark from conquering and enslaving the world’s free peoples (and even bringing death and destruction and ruin and terror to all) with a mighty war machine that Mandark is secretly building after Mandark, insulted by not being invited to Dee Dee’s birthday party by Dee Dee herself, declares war on the world’s free peoples…

But this, Dexter’s Odyssey, can still be the whetstone with which I could hone my talent, craft, and skills.

Or would it?

Given that Walt Disney’s Fantasia (1940) is one of the most ambitious movies ever made in America, as well as Disney’s most ambitious movie ever, it is not really surprising that I, for one, cite Walt Disney’s 1940 Fantasia as my most favorite Disney movie ever. 

In fact, I have seen Fantasia numerous times ever since my parents bought me a VHS copy of Disney’s Fantasia back in 1991, given that I now have the Fantasia Anthology DVD box set from 15 years ago (2000, that is.), but not the actual 2010 Blu Ray release. 

And most recently, I am just beginning to rediscover not only Disney’s Fantasia (1940), but also Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), as well as the two parts of Genndy Tartakovsky’s Emmy award-winning Samurai Jack: The Birth of Evil (both 2003). 

For me, Disney’s Fantasia, Stanley Kubrick’s 2001, and Genndy Tartakovsky’s Birth of Evil episodes from the latter’s 2001-2004 cartoon show, Samurai Jack, represents a fusion of simplicity and pure cinematic storytelling in that it is told more with visuals and sound and music rather than with dialogue and/or narration.

Yes, Fantasia is a very ambitious experiment on all the arts (especially classical music as well as those of the cinematic kind) that is very ahead of its time 75 years ago.

Yes, 2001: A Space Odyssey is “a really good science fiction movie” created by Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke, that is done more with visuals than with words, but was only embraced by hippies in the 1960s as “The Ultimate Trip” despite initially hostile reaction from some critics at the time of its release in 1968.

And yes, the Samurai Jack two-parter The Birth of Evil, is one of the most amazing animated things you and I will ever see on TV in the pre-Game of Thrones era, despite being only an hour long in total, and it depicts not only the origin story of the demon wizard Aku (Samurai Jack’s nemesis on the show) from the battle between an evil, inky black, intergalactic blob, and three deities from Norse, Hindu and Egyptian mythology, to a piece of said blob’s arrival on Earth to kill the Dinosaurs (and its subsequent expansion into a La Brea Tar Pit-like pit of death), through the arrival of humans in Japan to Samurai Jack’s father (The Japanese Emperor) bringing said pit of death to life as Aku, but also the forging of Samurai Jack’s father’s magic sword and how Samurai Jack’s father, the Japanese Emperor, imprisons said demon wizard (Aku) in a big black tree, before ending with the birth of Samurai Jack, the Emperor’s son. 

But I also think Fantasia, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and Parts One and Two of the Samurai Jack episode Birth of Evil combines pure cinematic storytelling with simplicity (as in very little or no dialogue or narration, but lots of visuals, sound, and music).

And I revere Fantasia and 2001: A Space Odyssey and the two ‘Birth of Evil’ episodes from Samurai Jack so much, that not only I wanted to (and planned to) analyze (and even dissect each and every frame of) Fantasia, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and the two parts of the Samurai Jack episode The Birth of Evil in a very in-depth and ‘up, close and personal’ kind of way, but I even made a collage tribute to all three things (that is, Fantasia, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and Samurai Jack: The Birth of Evil), which you may see below:

Anyway, I had always wanted to work on what I described as “An Epic Journey through Pictures and Music”, similar to the segments in Disney’s Fantasia, and sure, I will get the blueprint from the Disney movie, and that will be the technique of blending music perfectly with the animated art—whether it be hand drawn traditional animation or modern computer generated animation, but my intention is to apply that to a single cohesive narrative or story that will nonetheless be dialogue free or almost dialogue free and set to an original music score instead of classical music pieces.

So in many ways, it may not be comparable to the 1940 Disney Classic that is Fantasia, especially in tribute or style, for my so-called “Epic Journey through Pictures and Music” should stand all on its own not only by expanding the technique of blending music perfectly with the animated art with a single cohesive narrative or story or plot, as well as possibly with the addition of sound effects as well as with minimal use of dialogue and/or narration, but also updating it for this modern age of CGI animated movies such as Tangled, Wreck-it Ralph, Frozen and most recently, Big Hero 6.

As for my so-called ‘Epic Journey through Pictures and Music’, it can be the whetstone with which I could hone my talent, craft, skills, and ideas until I would be happy with the ultimate, final, finished shape or form my Epic Journey through Pictures and Music will ultimately take.

Maybe my Epic Journey through Pictures and Music could be this one idea that was on the back of my mind ever since as early as 2006: Dexter’s Odyssey.

Even if Dexter’s Odyssey might become An Epic Journey through Pictures and Music similar to the segments in Walt Disney’s Fantasia (1940), it may be as far removed from the tone and scope of its source material (Dexter’s Laboratory, a pretty standard kids cartoon show (as far as storytelling) from the mid to late 1990s) as can be imagined…

It may also be a weird mash up of different things that may be seemingly unrelated to each other from Dexter’s Lab cartoon characters and/or Samurai Jack cartoon characters to dinosaurs to Japanese samurai to elements of the quest plot of J.R.R. Tolkien’s three-volume fantasy epic The Lord of the Rings (battles and all) to even the Do Do Bird from the obscure 1938 Warner Bros. cartoon short, Porky in Wackyland…

In addition, to use said different things seemingly unrelated to each other, from Dexter’s Laboratory cartoon characters and/or Samurai Jack cartoon characters to dinosaurs to Japanese samurai to even said Do Do bird from Porky in Wackyland not only like actors but also like toys on a child’s playset will be a daring, challenging, and eye-popping-ly bold move, and to try and accurately animate dinosaurs based on today’s scientific research will be a challenge as daunting as mounting an epic Lord of the Rings-style battle or an epic samurai battle…

And finally, instead of the usual comedic misadventures of Dexter and his sister Dee Dee, it will trace the epic Lord of the Rings-like journey of Dexter, his sister Dee Dee, and Dee Dee’s two friends Mee Mee and Lee Lee, on an epic Lord of the Rings-like quest to stop Dexter’s rival Mandark from conquering and enslaving the world’s free peoples (and even bringing death and destruction and ruin and terror to all) with a mighty war machine that Mandark is secretly building after Mandark, insulted by not being invited to Dee Dee’s birthday party by Dee Dee herself, declares war on the world’s free peoples…

But if my Epic Journey through Pictures and Music will ever be something original which I could fashion to my own liking, then maybe I will center it instead on the single story of a touching friendship between two persons from two very different sides of the tracks.

One person may possibly be Akima, a young, modern, teenage or college-age, Japanese American girl or woman who is technically a female time traveler who travels backwards and forwards  through time, space, and beyond infinity (as in part of the title for 2001: A Space Odyssey’s final section, “Jupiter and Beyond the Infinite”), and who also possesses everything like objects and knowledge of the past, present, future (for instance, she would talk about either a certain madman like Adolf Hitler who caused World War II or a certain police officer from more recent times whose shooting of an African American youngster plunges this one American town (Ferguson, Missouri) into misery, chaos, and madness, and she keeps guns, swords, and other weapons and gadgets in her cottage-shaped house which seems bigger on the inside like the famous TARDIS from a certain British piece of famous science fiction called Doctor Who), as well as dressing in clothes that are unknown to those around her, like, for instance, the Union and Confederate armies who fight during the American Civil War). She is also the ‘great white whale’ of a villainous Captain Ahab-esque Confederate colonel hunting for a ‘strange young belle who came from the wrong end of time’. And in case no one will ever get it, Akima may be loosely based (especially in physical appearance) on a certain character that I like from the recent Oscar Winner Big Hero 6:

The legendary Go Go Tomago of the fabled San Fransokyo, that is.

The other person may possibly be Brandon, a young Northern orphan boy from Civil War-era Maryland whom Akima comforts and took in under her wing after marauding Confederate troops under the command of a villainous Captain Ahab-esque Confederate colonel (who is obsessed with hunting down and destroy ‘a strange young belle who came from the wrong end of time’, the aforementioned Akima) killed his mother and father and siblings while storming his homestead and the Union troops protecting it.

A unique science fiction twist on as well as a touching story of friendship set against the epic backdrop of, say, the American Civil War, isn’t it?

Anyway, either way, and whatever title, shape or form my so-called “Epic Journey through Pictures and Music” may take, not only would what I call “An Epic Journey Through Pictures and Music” be my dream passion project, but also the whetstone with which I can hone my talent, craft, skills, and/or ideas.

Any thought or opinion on what I describe as “An Epic Journey through Pictures and Music”?

Toshi of the Islands of the Rising Sun by timbox129
Toshi of the Islands of the Rising Sun

I know Japan will hold the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo five years from now (and four years on from the Summer Olympic Games in Brazil which is coming next year), but…

For those who grow up on Dexter’s Laboratory in the 1990s and early 2000s, Toshi, Dexter’s Japanese Replacement from the half hour episode Last But Not Beast, hail from these ‘Islands of the Rising Sun’—Japan that is.

In fact, the people of Japan call their homeland “Nippon”, which means “origins of the Sun” because the Japanese people once believed that the sun first shines upon the Japanese islands.

Besides doing movies, comics or animation, just as T.E. Lawrence (the subject of Lawrence of Arabia) knows and learns about the Middle East and its peoples and their culture and history, I have always wanted to know and learn more about Japan and its people and their culture and history, etc., and not just on the internet.

Yes, we have to get through Next Year’s Summer Olympic Games in Brazil first. but five years from now, are you ready for 2020’s Tokyo Olympiad?

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Fantasia, 2001, and The Birth of Evil by timbox129
Fantasia, 2001, and The Birth of Evil

Here lies my collage tribute to Walt Disney’s Fantasia (1940), Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), and the two parts of Genndy Tartakovsky’s Samurai Jack: The Birth of Evil (2003).

And so the question is:

What do you think of Fantasia, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and Samurai Jack: The Birth of Evil Parts 1 and 2, respectively?

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timbox129's Profile Picture
timbox129
Timothy Robert McKenzie
Artist | Student | Film & Animation
United States
Hello. My name is Tim. My favorite cartoons are Dexter's Laboratory and Samurai Jack, while one of my favorite movies is James Cameron's AVATAR. I always wanted to become a filmmaker and animation artist.
Interests

People who really know animation might know not only the sad story of Richard Williams’ failed magnum opus The Thief and the Cobbler (1964-1992; released 1993 and 1995) but also the story of my dream passion project, Dexter’s Odyssey, which is Dexter’s Laboratory meets The Lord of the Rings with dinosaurs and shades of Samurai Jack.

This writer might spend years, or even decades, on this one film project, a multi-part and visually lush, dinosaur-infused epic fantasy tracing the epic Lord of the Rings-like journey of Dexter, Dee Dee (his sister) and Mee Mee and Lee Lee (Dee Dee’s black and Asian friends) on a quest across vast patches of dinosaur-inhabited wilderness and far off exotic distant lands in order to stop the evil Mandark (Dexter’s rival) from conquering and enslaving the world’s free peoples with a mighty war machine that he is secretly building after Mandark—furious that Dee Dee didn’t invited him to her birthday party—declares war on the free world.

This project will be intended by yours truly to be my masterpiece, but also one with a more realistic interaction between humans and dinosaurs than even that for The Flintstones (1960-66), as well as containing some of the most complex animations ever attempted onscreen whether it’s hand drawn or computer generated.

I may or I may not get full funding for the Dexter’s Odyssey project until I achieve success or even win an award or something, so for years or decades yet to come, I’d just pick at it, in-between working on other things, for Dexter’s Odyssey can be the whetstone with which I could hone my talent, craft, skills, and ideas.

And my art style might keep improving and changing, becoming more and more complex. Sure, 2D hand drawn traditional animation is largely out of style these days, replaced by digital 3D CGI animations such as TangledWreck-it RalphFrozen and most recently, Big Hero 6.

And you know, if I were to become a great animator, and if I were to hire many other animation hands—including the great animators of the 1980s and 1990s Disney Renaissance—to pass on their knowledge to a whole new generation of young animators before all that knowledge and especially the 2d hand drawn traditional animation techniques will be lost forever, then Dexter’s Odyssey will be one of my ways to learn. 

And if I do, I’ll set up my own studio to help train an entire new generation of young soon-to-be great animators and help make another revival in animation, one that will be very diverse especially in technique.

And sure, even more than just a footnote in animation history, Dexter’s Odyssey is gonna be a hugely influential animated movie project. And not to mention, a work of genius, pure and simple. I may be a genius who may be difficult to work with or demand perfection from my crew, but I may become an inspiration as well as a great teacher.

And sure, given my obsession over making Dexter’s Odyssey, I would also create some of the most spectacular, beautifully lush, and intricately complex animations of all time, hand drawn or CGI—for example, Mandark’s machine of war, which is filled with every piece of weaponry and machinery imaginable—and some of the most delightfully subtle. Plus beautiful cinematography and lighting effects; every in-camera and/or digital trick in the book, and a hundred which aren't.

Dexter’s Odyssey will not technically be a Disney movie for it is something absolutely unique: a giant epic animated film project that may be as though it is designed somewhere in the 20th century more than the 21st, using design trends from anywhere and from the 20th and 21st centuries, and all sorts of ideas, including a weird mash-up of different things that may seem unrelated to each other—from Dexter’s Laboratory cartoon characters to Samurai Jack cartoon characters to dinosaurs to Japanese samurai to even the Do Do Bird from the 1930s Warner Bros. Cartoon Short, Porky in Wackyland:

Sure, apart from the Do Do Bird from Porky in Wackyland, some or almost many of the characters (including Dexter, Dee Dee, Mee Mee and Lee Lee and Mandark) may look like they came out of Genndy Tartakovsky’s 1990s work on Dexter’s Laboratory or his work on Samurai Jack, but they could still move with perfect fluidity whether it’s realistic or stylized. It will be a dream on an epic scale and scope and with epic grandeur. And seriously, guys, the whole entire thing will be in the language of a great dream.

And seriously, guys, anything is possible in the world of the animation art-form.

Or as this sign above from the 1938 Warner Bros. Cartoon Porky in Wackyland says:

"IT CAN HAPPEN HERE

And only through animation can anything really possibly happen.

((And animation is not a genre. It is a technique.))

You understand, Your Majesty, Father of Samurai Jack?

Well, given my intention for Dexter’s Odyssey to be a really great epic masterpiece of animation art, of film or cinematic art, and of human art, it will be unsurprising that Dexter’s Odyssey will also not just be an animated cartoon movie or a Disney movie but a really epic event and epic experience.

I just wanted just about everything about Dexter’s Odyssey to really blow away just about everyone (especially those who will get to see it)—and it’ll be like realizing there’s a whole other half of David Lean’s Lawrence of Arabia right after that movie’s intermission, or that Michelangelo’s Adam isn't just sicking his pointy finger at the sky on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel (And you know, Adam is just sticking his pointy finger directly at the finger of Almighty God).

Do you understand, Go Go Tomago?

Yes, this may be as far removed from the tone and scope of one of its source materials (Dexter’s Laboratory, a kids cartoon show from the mid to late 1990s that is pretty standard as far as storytelling) as can be imagined…

Yes, it will be a weird mash up of different things that may be seemingly unrelated to each other from Dexter’s Lab cartoon characters and/or Samurai Jack cartoon characters to dinosaurs to Japanese samurai to elements of the quest plot of J.R.R. Tolkien’s three-volume fantasy epic The Lord of the Rings (battles and all) to even the Do Do Bird from the obscure 1938 Warner Bros. cartoon short, Porky in Wackyland

Yes, to use said different things seemingly unrelated to each other, from Dexter’s Laboratory cartoon characters and/or Samurai Jack cartoon characters to dinosaurs to Japanese samurai to even said Do Do bird from Porky in Wackyland, not just like characters but also like toys on a child’s play-set will be a daring, challenging, and bold move, and to try and accurately animate dinosaurs based on today’s scientific research will be a challenge as daunting as mounting an epic Lord of the Rings-style battle, especially if they involve Japanese samurai…

And yes, instead of the usual comedic misadventures of Dexter and his sister Dee Dee, it will trace the epic Lord of the Rings-like journey of Dexter, his sister Dee Dee, and Dee Dee’s two friends Mee Mee and Lee Lee, on an epic Lord of the Rings-like quest to stop Dexter’s rival Mandark from conquering and enslaving the world’s free peoples (and even bringing death and destruction and ruin and terror to all) with a mighty war machine that Mandark is secretly building after Mandark, insulted by not being invited to Dee Dee’s birthday party by Dee Dee herself, declares war on the world’s free peoples…

But this, Dexter’s Odyssey, can still be the whetstone with which I could hone my talent, craft, and skills.

Or would it?

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Comments


Add a Comment:
 
:iconone-concerned:
One-Concerned Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2014
If I remade Dexter's Lab, how would you respond if I announced that Dee Dee wasn't allowed to dance?
Reply
:icontimbox129:
timbox129 Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2014  Student Filmographer
I know I am autistic, but would my quest to fulfill my dreams be built on as well end in controversy or not?

If so, would my actual life (especially on the internet and especially during the making of Dexter's Odyssey) might forever remain the subject of controversy?
Reply
:iconkittyacademy:
KittyAcademy Featured By Owner Jun 14, 2014   Digital Artist
I thought Japanese/Chinese Boys don't wear Komonos however you spell it.
Reply
:icontimbox129:
timbox129 Featured By Owner Jun 14, 2014  Student Filmographer
Well, Japanese and Chinese boys do wear their traditional clothes (kimonos for boys of the Japanese kind) in ancient days, and some modern Japanese boys (or sometimes girls) still wore traditional kimonos, though some wore more modern clothes. 

After all, Samurai Jack is a cartoon to you and I, so Jack still wears a kimono even as a child, given the fact that he is a time-displaced warrior prince.
Reply
:icontimbox129:
timbox129 Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2013  Student Filmographer
Hey guys, if you want to see Dexter's Lab and Samurai Jack screenshots and fan musings...

Then....

Check...

This...

Out!

[link]

Remember, here there be stills or screenshots from Samurai Jack as well as those from Dexter's Laboratory.

Not to mention my fan musings.

And BTW, while you're at it, what do you see on my Tumblr blog, "Timboxreloaded"?
Reply
:iconlipanel:
Lipanel Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2012
Hello?
Reply
:iconsumikuro:
Sumikuro Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2012
Dexter Odyssey sounds amazing, are you going to Calarts to learn animation?
Reply
:iconsoundofspheres:
soundofspheres Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012
Hello, if you're interested in making an epic film, I'd recommend reading "The Hero with a Thousand Faces" by Joseph Campbell. Some of the best directors have used it as a guide.
Reply
:icontimbox129:
timbox129 Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012  Student Filmographer
Here's an update for you, soundofspheres. It's official that I finally got the book "The Hero with a Thousand Faces" by Joseph Campbell yesterday on Christmas Morning 2012. Thank you, soundofsphere, for recommending me to read Joseph Campbell's classic 1949 book The Hero with a Thousand Faces, and I'll make sure to use that book as a guide if I am interested in making an epic film like my intended masterpiece (and proposed Dexter's Laboratory reboot) the monumental and colossal 12-part live action/animated epic that is Dexter's Odyssey.

Again, thanks a lot for recommending that influential book by Joseph Campbell to me.

Once again, Thank You!
Reply
:icontimbox129:
timbox129 Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Student Filmographer
Good recommendation, soundofspheres! I'll have that for Christmas!
Reply
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